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Krzyki - an area of many flavours with its sub-districts varying from pre-war townhouses to modern tower blocks

Locals describe Krzyki as a catch-all term for the numerous districts that fall within the city’s south-eastern chunk.

Krzyki
Based in Wroclaw, Poland
Krzyki
Based in Wroclaw, Poland

Krzyki 

Vast in size, locals describe Krzyki as a catch-all term for the numerous districts that fall within the city’s south-eastern chunk. Formally established in 1952, it’s an area of many flavours with its sub-districts varying from prestige postcodes in pre-war districts to tower block developments imposed on the city in the 60s and 70s. As part of this varied patchwork of style, parks and leisure facilities are amply spread around and include a historic horse-racing track with an elaborate grandstand dating from 1907. Beginning with a sand-coloured train station built in 1857, Krzyki is awash with history, and this reveals itself further down via a controversial cemetery dedicated to the Soviet soldiers that fell during the 1945 siege of Festung Breslau. Frozen in time, the Jewish Cemetery, meanwhile, is poignantly beautiful with its vine-encrusted shattered tombs making it one of Wrocław’s most enchanting and touching sites.

Architecture & Property 

So large is Krzyki that it almost defies classification. As the sum of many parts, different sub-districts tout their own distinct flavour, something that becomes apparent visiting the scenic area of Borek. Here, down elegant tree-lined side streets, often lavish pre-war mansions bristle amid the pretty greenery. Just outside of Borek, the Centauris apartment complex provides a contemporary counter-balance to the historic undercurrent. Slotting below Borek, and spidering around the city’s horse-racing track, areas such as Oltaszyn, Partynice and Krzyki are famed for their detached and semi-detached modernist era properties, whilst Wojszyce and Klecina also tout a large stock of family-friendly lettings planted around quiet, sleepy side streets.

Closer to the centre, it's unlikely you will miss the Sky Tower; briefly enjoying a fleeting moment as Poland’s tallest building, this 51-storey glass behemoth is naturally regarded as a high prestige address whose commanding views aren’t the sole selling point. Symbolic of modern day Wrocław, it’s become the defining landmark of Krzyki. Close by, Nowe Centrum Południowe is a dynamically developing office-residential complex that complements the work-play-live model espoused by the immediate area.

As conspicuous as it is, the Sky Tower is not the only notable piece of standalone architecture; in the form of Browar Mieszczański the city has a unique arts and events space set to an edgy, post-industrial background, whilst the red brick water tower on Sudecka mixes Neo Gothic and Neo Romanesque inspirations to present one of the most bizarre sights in the city – it wouldn’t look out of place in the works of J.K. Rowling.

Architecture & Property 

So large is Krzyki that it almost defies classification. As the sum of many parts, different sub-districts tout their own distinct flavour, something that becomes apparent visiting the scenic area of Borek. Here, down elegant tree-lined side streets, often lavish pre-war mansions bristle amid the pretty greenery. Just outside of Borek, the Centauris apartment complex provides a contemporary counter-balance to the historic undercurrent. Slotting below Borek, and spidering around the city’s horse-racing track, areas such as Oltaszyn, Partynice and Krzyki are famed for their detached and semi-detached modernist era properties, whilst Wojszyce and Klecina also tout a large stock of family-friendly lettings planted around quiet, sleepy side streets.

Closer to the centre, it's unlikely you will miss the Sky Tower; briefly enjoying a fleeting moment as Poland’s tallest building, this 51-storey glass behemoth is naturally regarded as a high prestige address whose commanding views aren’t the sole selling point. Symbolic of modern day Wrocław, it’s become the defining landmark of Krzyki. Close by, Nowe Centrum Południowe is a dynamically developing office-residential complex that complements the work-play-live model espoused by the immediate area.

As conspicuous as it is, the Sky Tower is not the only notable piece of standalone architecture; in the form of Browar Mieszczański the city has a unique arts and events space set to an edgy, post-industrial background, whilst the red brick water tower on Sudecka mixes Neo Gothic and Neo Romanesque inspirations to present one of the most bizarre sights in the city – it wouldn’t look out of place in the works of J.K. Rowling.

Greenery & Recreational Spaces 

Residents of Krzyki are spoiled for choice when it comes to parks. Of the more high profile, the jewel in the crown is Park Południowy, a tranquil idyll with a large lake, romantic little bridges, decorative ponds and a larch wood gazebo built recently to replace the 19th century original after it burned down. As if to underscore its candidacy for the title of Wroclaw’s most romantic park, a statue of the composer Chopin sits amid blooming flowers. Featuring a maze made from hedgerows, Park Brochowski also enjoys great popularity as do the green spaces of Skowroni and Andersa. For those favouring a more active approach to life, the Aquapark is regarded as one of the best facilities of its type in Central Eastern Europe.



Transport 

Car: from the centre of Krzyki, the Old Town can be accessed in between 15 and 45 minutes during the rush hour.

Train: Wrocław Główny sits just within Krzyki’s official borders. From the area’s southernmost edge it will usually take 15 to 40 minutes to reach.

Tram: trams and buses honeycomb Krzyki ensuring smooth and regular connections to the city centre and beyond.

Cycling: Krzyki is well-suited to cyclists and bike paths can be found running alongside major roads such as Borowska, Slezna and Powstańców Śląskich. Aside from these, leisure trails can be found in parks such as Andersa and Skowroni.

Plane: typically speaking, the airport lies around 30 to 60 minutes away by car.



Transport 

Car: from the centre of Krzyki, the Old Town can be accessed in between 15 and 45 minutes during the rush hour.

Train: Wrocław Główny sits just within Krzyki’s official borders. From the area’s southernmost edge it will usually take 15 to 40 minutes to reach.

Tram: trams and buses honeycomb Krzyki ensuring smooth and regular connections to the city centre and beyond.

Cycling: Krzyki is well-suited to cyclists and bike paths can be found running alongside major roads such as Borowska, Slezna and Powstańców Śląskich. Aside from these, leisure trails can be found in parks such as Andersa and Skowroni.

Plane: typically speaking, the airport lies around 30 to 60 minutes away by car.



Amenities 

The immensity of Krzyki ensures that it lacks nothing in terms of amenities: whether it be private clinics such as Medicover and Emka Med or contemporary shopping centres like Wroclavia, the area could easily function as a city in its own right.  



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See more guides for nearby areas:

Old Town

Grabiszyn